Crank Brothers Iodine 2 Wheels Review

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Product Full Name | Crank Brothers Iodine 2 Wheelset

Retail Price | £499.99

Available From | Extra UK

Crank Brothers Iodine 2 – revised and improved

These are the brand new Crank Brothers Iodine wheels – which are now in their third generation.

Crank Brothers Iodine

The ribs that the 24 spokes hook on to make the Crank Brothers wheels easily identifiable at a glance.

There are two models in the range – the high specced Iodine 3 model, and these mid-range  Iodine 2 models – that retail for under £500.

 

The Detail

Both models feature a 28mm internal rim width (32.5mm external) that supports tyres from 2.3 up to 2.8in. The Iodine wheels also have a unique 24 spoke design, and are fully tubeless compatible.

Crank Brothers Iodine

The sturdy rims support the tyres well, and are plenty stiff enough for berm bashing.

The construction of Crank Brothers wheels is unique in the mountain bike world, but uses a system very similar to high-end Moto Trials wheels (check this shot out and this one too). The reason Crank Brothers went down this route, was to develop a strong, light wheel – and make them properly tubeless compatible without having to manufacture a complicated rim design.

Like the original Mavic UST rims, Crank Brothers use a fully sealed rim bed, so no rim strip conversion kit, or Gorilla tape bodging is needed. As far as we’re concerned – if the rim bed is not sealed like the aforementioned designs, it is not properly tubeless.

Crank Brothers Iodine

Although I did not need to tighten any spokes, if you do you need to make sure you relieve the tension after – otherwise the ends of the nipples can creak in the hub.

Tubeless Compatible‘ and ‘Tubeless Ready‘ are loose marketing terms slung around, but can be a little misleading as often mean nothing more than a conventional rim that comes with a conversion kit to seal off the spoke holes.

The Mavic system is expensive to produce, as it uses a nipple that screws in to the rim and on to the spoke at the same time. It works really well, but is a complex thing (image right here) to manufacture.Crank Brothers Iodine

The Crank Brothers system essentially has elongated straight pull nipples at the hub end; that meet with short spokes that connect to tabs on the rim. This enables the rim to remain completely sealed for tubeless set up, and means spokes can be changed with the tyres on if need be.

Crank Brothers Iodine

Note how the nipples mount in the hub – our rear sample developed a tiny creak when the combination of gunk and ultra dry and dusty trails exposed a minute amount of movement.

The hubs are straight pull and come in either regular 15mm bolt through – or Boost up front; and 12mm x 142mm or Boost 148mm out back. The wheels also come with the option of either a standard Shimano freehub body, or the SRAM DX driver. Both wheels use quality cartridge bearings, and weigh in at 1830grams in the 27.5in size, or 1900 in 29in.

Out On The Trail

Having ridden both previous generations of the Iodine wheels, was particularly interested to see how strong these new wheels are, and how well they are built.  The first ones (that came in a cool copper colour ) were unbelievably strong, but suffered from a poor freehub body design. The second iteration had a simplified hub design, and faired better but weren’t quite as strong.

These third generation bad boys seem to have it pretty much perfect though. Hub design is simple, well sealed and houses decent bearings. I’ve hammered them with the jet wash and they’re still spinning well, and still have plenty of uncontaminated grease in there.Crank Brothers Iodine

The overall wheel feels stiff too – especially so when you consider they have 24 spokes. Which is not a lot for a wheel aimed at hard all mountain riding, but thanks to the way the long oversized nipples support the short spokes, it works very effectively.

Crank Brothers Iodine

It was a hell of an impact, but the crease came out afterwards.

I really made an effort to give these wheels a hard life, and the worst they came back with in the first month was a slight creak from out back. Due to the way the whole nipple spins in the hub mounting, if there is any minute movement they can creak. My samples were dusty as anything though, and once cleaned didn’t make the same noise again.

I have managed to damage the rear rim though – admittedly whilst testing the Huck Norris tyre and rim protection system. Whilst running 20psi, I managed to ding the rear rim in a horrendously rough rock garden, going as fast as I dared. Whilst this creased the rim, the wheel is perfectly true and there is no hop in it at all. And despite the looks, the tyre stayed up.

I was expecting to damage the rim when bending it back after, but it has moved to the original position without any signs of damage, and things are back on track again. No air loss, and everything running true.

We Say

I’ve always been drawn to Crank Brothers Iodine wheels as the styling is so unique, and I like the way they manage to solve a few problems in an alternative way.

They are a fairly lightweight option, that do seem to have addressed the minor issues of previous models. And they are properly tubeless too.

Although I did damage the rear rim in testing, any rim would have been damaged in the same scenario – and I know many would have come off worse. 

Crank Brothers Iodine wheels are definitely one of the more interesting wheels out there, though the marmite looks might put some people off.

Not me though, I love marmite. 

 

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